Tuesday, November 6, 2012

Lucia Visiting Anglican leader has a reality disconnect

Complete disconnect between those who champion same-same marriage and reality.

Gay marriage has strengthened Canadian society, a visiting Anglican leader says.

The Very Rev Dr Peter Elliott, Rector of Christ Church Anglican Cathedral in Vancouver, preached in St Paul's Cathedral in Dunedin yesterday.

His visit is part of the Anglican Consultative Council underway in Auckland.

Dr Elliott, who is gay, said that while he did not believe in commenting on a country's domestic politics, legalising gay marriage had increased respect and tolerance in Canada.

Riiiight.

From Same-Sex Marriage Ten Years On: Lessons from Canada (hattip Protect Marriage):

What has happened in Canada as a result of same-sex marriage is "restrictions on free speech rights, parental rights in education, and autonomy rights of religious institutions, along with a weakening of the marriage culture."

For example, with regards to free speech:

Much speech that was permitted before same-sex marriage now carries risks. Many of those who have persisted in voicing their dissent have been subjected to investigations by human rights commissions and (in some cases) proceedings before human rights tribunals. Those who are poor, poorly educated, and without institutional affiliation have been particularly easy targets—anti-discrimination laws are not always applied evenly. Some have been ordered to pay fines, make apologies, and undertake never to speak publicly on such matters again. Targets have included individuals writing letters to the editors of local newspapers, and ministers of small congregations of Christians. A Catholic bishop faced two complaints—both eventually withdrawn—prompted by comments he made in a pastoral letter about marriage.

Reviewing courts have begun to rein in the commissions and tribunals (particularly since some ill-advised proceedings against Mark Steyn and Maclean’s magazine in 2009), and restore a more capacious view of freedom of speech. And in response to the public outcry following the Steyn/Maclean’s affair, the Parliament of Canada recently revoked the Canadian Human Rights Commission’s statutory jurisdiction to pursue “hate speech.”

But the financial cost of fighting the human rights machine remains enormous—Maclean’s spent hundreds of thousands of dollars in legal fees, none of which is recoverable from the commissions, tribunals, or complainants. And these cases can take up to a decade to resolve. An ordinary person with few resources who has drawn the attention of a human rights commission has no hope of appealing to the courts for relief; such a person can only accept the admonition of the commission, pay a (comparatively) small fine, and then observe the directive to remain forever silent. As long as these tools remain at the disposal of the commissions—for whom the new orthodoxy gives no theoretical basis to tolerate dissent—to engage in public discussion about same-sex marriage is to court ruin.

Similar pressure can be—and is—brought to bear on dissenters by professional governing bodies (such as bar associations, teachers’ colleges, and the like) that have statutory power to discipline members for conduct unbecoming of the profession. Expressions of disagreement with the reasonableness of institutionalizing same-sex marriage are understood by these bodies to be acts of illegal discrimination, which are matters for professional censure.

Teachers are particularly at risk for disciplinary action, for even if they only make public statements criticizing same-sex marriage outside the classroom, they are still deemed to create a hostile environment for gay and lesbian students. Other workplaces and voluntary associations have adopted similar policies as a result of their having internalized this new orthodoxy that disagreement with same-sex marriage is illegal discrimination that must not be tolerated.

The Very Rev Dr Peter Elliott might like to maybe look at the other side of what he considers to have made Canada more respectful and tolerant. It's just that the opposing voices have been stomped on, and stomped on hard.

Related link: Marriage equality increase respect - Anglican leader ~ New Zealand Herald

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