Monday, October 29, 2012

Lucia I prefer the six monthly warrant of fitness check

This proposal of random pull-overs in order to check the road worthiness of my vehicle is seriously disturbing.

The government is considering law changes that will pave the way for private warrant of fitness (WOF) inspectors to pull over vehicles, says Associate Transport Minister Simon Bridges.

Mr Bridges told TV3's The Nation that under new reforms cars would only need a WOF annually rather than every six months.

"Randomised" roadside checks could also be carried out by private companies, contracted by the government, to check the safety of cars. Currently, only police can conduct roadside checks.

Annual rather than six monthly WOF checks would increase road safety, if accompanied by more roadside checks, which was a smarter way to do it, he said.

I would much rather retain the six monthly WOF checks, personally. I can book the appointment and I don't have to worry about random pull overs and potential delays on my journeys making me late for what ever I'm on my way to at the time.

What the heck is wrong with the system we have now?

Related link: Private 'WOF police' for NZ roads: Bridges

7 comment(s):

ZenTiger said...

It's a ridiculous idea. If private companies want to make money by catching people, its in their interests to setup roadblocks and check each car passing by.

Some people (like young female drivers) might be pulled over and intimidated by people posing as the WoF Gestapo, or might even be such people.

It's a disaster waiting for an increasingly Stalinist Government to implement.

Not that I'm advocating this, but a slightly more sensible proposal would be to empower parking wardens to issue notices for a vehicle without a current WoF.

Ciaron said...

Not that I'm advocating this, but a slightly more sensible proposal would be to empower parking wardens to issue notices for a vehicle without a current WoF.

They do already. I once got stung $400 because they had both (the warrant and license) expired within a day or two and I had forgotten to get them renewed, in the middle of exams if I remember rightly...

Lucia Maria said...

Ciaron,

Ouch!

We used to get reminders from our garage when the WOF was due - that helped a lot. But then exam time would kind of push all other priorities into the background!

I'm going to have to remember the WOF time now as we bought a newer car a couple of months ago (a Mazda Premacy). I do miss the larger engine of the Mitsubishi!

Ciaron said...

We used to get reminders from our garage when the WOF was due - that helped a lot.

Yep. Got those too. Only problem was the came about a month before the expiration date and they went straight into the "later" pile and promptly forgotten. I'ts all my fault because I had ample warning.

I do however feel that $40, twice a year, per car is a little more than revenue gathering seeing as I have only ever had to replace the odd lamp, wiper blade and top up the windscreen washing fluid...

ZenTiger said...

Ouch on the fine via the parking wardens. So it seems the issue is completely covered.

The only remaining discussion point then is if 12 monthly warrants are enough.

I think the advantage of regular warrants for older cars is that things like bad brake pads and bald tyres get picked up and potentially save lives (I'm thinking here of the innocent passengers and the people in the oncoming car). It would seem to be a pity that we need the force of the State to maintain safety standards though, but if it's mandatory to do every 12 months, then does every six months make much difference?

I guess when they whack you for $400 for being a bit late, it does. A little bit of leeway might be good - like 30 days grace and if the warrant comes up clean then the fine is $30 to cover admin.

Seán said...

What about 12 month WOF without random pullovers? (confusing 2 iassus here?) Wouldn't that be better...and more sensible...I read only NZ has pedantic 6m checks.

Safety and technology of cars has moved on since whenever the 6m term was introduced. Show me that 12m isn't sufficient...

Ciaron said...

The argument goes (rightly or wrongly) that the average car in NZ is 12yrs old, hence we have an old fleet, and old cars break down more/ are less safe etc; etc; etc.

Post a Comment

Please be respectful. Foul language and personal attacks may get your comment deleted without warning. Contact us if your comment doesn't appear - the spam filter may have grabbed it.