Sunday, October 18, 2009

ZenTiger That's got to help race relations

"Why are we fighting whakapapa against whakapapa? There's so much enemy that is not brown." -- Pita Sharples, to Gang Members.

Where does one go with a statement like that? It's possibly worse when one understands the context. Perhaps I'll change the subject then.

In the brown camp, you have beer, kahlua and a dark malt whiskey. I guess white enemies might be P, cocaine and crack. The greens (Grass and tobacco) are reasonably dangerous, but in a mild and long term way. Only thing is, can Pita Sharples sort these colored types out? I guess it depends on who he meant the "enemy" were.

Hat tip: Dim Post

And related but not related: Your worst nightmare about to be released

7 comment(s):

Redbaiter said...

"Where does one go with a statement like that?"

Where is there to go other than to the truth?

Pita Sharples, John Key's good buddy who "has the PM's ear", is a racist bastard who sees the white European as his enemy and seeks to engage the Maori gangs as an ally in the fight he perceives as eventually coming.

When do we start fighting back? If a White person said this about the Maori there would be a riot.

Things are only this for out of whack becasue we tolerate it. What miserable cowards the white race has become since it began drinking the Progressive Kool Ade.

Sean said...

I'm going to have to back Sharples on having this meeting. A bloody good idea actually. He got these people out of their comfort zone, into a corporate like environment (flying to meet the minister), and probably knocked a bit of sense into them "That's not to say Sharples had everyone nodding their heads in agreement. It was more like being called into the headmaster's study.". A good opportunity to get these gang leaders thinking of ...well, just thinking. Some different perspectives might have crossed their minds. The cost was peanuts.

And contrary to Plughead, I don't see this meeting as inconsistent with the government's get tough on crime stance. This meeting was had several months ago. The govt connected with them, talked with them, listened to them, told them how it was. Now Key wants to get tough on P. The timing is spot on, now when these gangs get targeted they can't say they weren't warned, weren't listed to, that they didn't have a choice.

The comment highlighted in the blog post wasn't particularly wise by Sharples, but given the context, he was probably just talking to them on their level. I wouldn't froth over it though Redbaiter does raise a valid point on double standards in our society.

ZenTiger said...

I think he's well meaning, but naive. I also think he can get away with such action that wouldn't work for mere pakeha. Especially the racist statement made above.

"Knocked a bit of sense into them"

Is that when he asked if he could help line up the benefits they may have had trouble receiving?

Admittedly, I cannot rely on the news report containing at least half the facts, but I'm not sure career criminals are going to change their ways after a meeting with the Minister. They'll just milk him for whatever they think they can get, and it will be business as usual (although maybe they lay into non-browns a bit heavier to show Sharples they listened?)

The comment highlighted in the blog post wasn't particularly wise by Sharples, but given the context, he was probably just talking to them on their level.

Not just unwise, but stupid and racist, I think.

The point of the meeting was to raise these guys up a level, not drop down to theirs.

If the new word was "respect" he didn't prove it by uttering those words. I'd have respect if what he said "behind closed doors" could be said to other people's faces. On this occasion, his Pakeha countrymen that are continually asked to ignore obvious racism and yet for the most part are not racist themselves.

As for calling the meeting in the first place - I'm inclined to agree with you on that, as I think his heart is in the right place and there is always a chance some benefit would come of it.

It does rankle though to realise any similar action by different groups would be judged by entirely different standards. Such is the way of the world. That, in my mind does not excuse the above comment (the topic of my post).

mojo said...

Indeed, Zen.

Sean said...

Well we're just going to have to agree to disagree. I commend Sharples for trying something different, for thinking outside the square. Afterall the status quo hasn't changed much over the years, I like his approach. It's bloody easy to hang back and dish out the populist platitudes, a lot more difficult to go and face these guys. Obviously he isn't going to solve all ills with this meeting, but I reckon it will go a long way.

ZenTiger said...

Well we're just going to have to agree to disagree.

Actually, I thought we were in agreement that the meeting was a good idea?

I'm just not excusing his statement because of his initiative in trying the meeting.

KG said...

"It's bloody easy to hang back and dish out the populist platitudes, a lot more difficult to go and face these guys. Obviously he isn't going to solve all ills with this meeting, but I reckon it will go a long way."

That'd be platitudes such as 'one standard of justice for all' and 'a colour-blind political and judicial system' I take it?
Pesky platitudes...

It'll go "a long way" all right, that meeting--a long way towards reinforcing the perception of the gangs that they're something other than criminals and thugs and the perception on the part of taxpaying votes that the moori party is a racist, separatist organisation funded by us for the benefit of a dysfunctional minority.
Why am I not surprised that yet another lefty is an apologist for this crap?

Post a Comment

Please be respectful. Foul language and personal attacks may get your comment deleted without warning. Contact us if your comment doesn't appear - the spam filter may have grabbed it.