Sunday, February 5, 2012

Andrei Secular crazies

Some people are congenital complaint layers.

And there are any number of Government bodies only too willing to receive their complaints and act upon them.

A short clip of a father giving his baby a bottle complain and you will be given satisfaction as the offending images are deep sixed.

In England it works on Christianity too: Bath Christian group's 'God can heal' adverts banned.

Apparently according to the Government funded ninnies who had been alerted to the adverts by a complainant
they could encourage false hope and were irresponsible.
Let's all put our faith in Big Government shall we - we can always count on bureaucrats to bring an end to cold snaps and prevent earthquakes can we not?

And new taxes to administer new rules and regulations will undoubtedly will ensure that we all will live forever.

9 comment(s):

macdoctor said...

Interesting how these people (who say miraculous healing is "false hope") are the very same ones who are happy to tolerate homeopathic remedies in every pharmacy and are perfectly comfortable with the outlandish claims made for chiropractics.

KG said...

Some religions are more equal than others...

leftrightout said...

Here we go again, the religious demanding special treatment and exemption from the law.

This case was quite simply about the making of false claims in advertising. The defendant would not have lots the case if they had been able to provide proof for their claims.

Churches claim to have "The Truth", and yet when challenged, can never provide evidence.

leftrightout said...

macdoctor said...
Interesting how these people (who say miraculous healing is "false hope") are the very same ones who are happy to tolerate homeopathic remedies in every pharmacy and are perfectly comfortable with the outlandish claims made for chiropractics.


Name them.

No rational humanist has any time for homeopathy, or chiropractic (except in limited circumstances).

Some of us even try to encourage pharmacists to remove the bullshit products from their shelves.

Matthew said...

the religious demanding special treatment and exemption from the law

No, the freedom to say what you believe to be true. The 'law' can never trump beliefs, and it is an absurd notion to try and do so outside of criminal law.

leftrightout said...

Matthew, they breached the advertising standards.

They could have simply shown up to the hearing and presented proof of their claims. They didn't, ergo their claims were baseless, misleading and quite probably out right lies.

Why does god never heal amputees?

scrubone said...

LRO, I know a guy who was healed by a christian service. He was an avowed skeptic before the service, and couldn't walk.

Now, he's a pastor. Bit hard to remain skeptical when you go from crutches and pain to running around a church in a matter or seconds.

I'll grant you there are healers out there that are frauds - in fact, I'll go so far as to say most of them are. But there are genuine miracles out there.

leftrightout said...

If your telling of the story is correct, I doubt he was ever an "avowed skeptic".

First, why would such a person attend a healing service? As a skeptic I would only go to pint, laugh and mock, not to expect healing.

Second, even if he were a skeptic, and even if, after attending a healing service, an avowed skeptic would not immediatly yell "HALALUJAH!" and convert on the spot. The avowed skepticv would first consider and weigh all the evidence, and then decide.

Perhaps you can point me to the source for this story, eg, the reports in the medical literature about the miraculous recovery.

As a skeptic, that's the type of evidence I seek.

scrubone said...

First, why would such a person attend a healing service? As a skeptic I would only go to pint, laugh and mock, not to expect healing.

He know someone who dragged him along.

Where did I say he expected healing? He didn't.

Second, even if he were a skeptic, and even if, after attending a healing service, an avowed skeptic would not immediatly yell "HALALUJAH!" and convert on the spot. The avowed skepticv would first consider and weigh all the evidence, and then decide.

I guess in your world, person hit with a 1 tone block of concrete would first weigh all the evidence, and then decide if the concrete was heavy and whether to be squashed flat.

My friend knew immediately that a miracle had occurred, something normally impossible. There was no question. In fact his skepticism (he'd deliberately tried to walk before attending the meeting) actually made the impact greater.

I don't know if it were an instant conversion BTW.

As a skeptic, that's the type of evidence I seek.

Yet earlier, you stated that you would go to a healing service to "pint, laugh and mock", not to look for evidence.

I'm not claiming that this story was published, or would satisfy you. In fact, I know for a fact that it won't, and you proved it by your opening remarks. If you want recorded miracles, there's plenty out there if you chose to investigate them yourself - Ian Wishart knows of a few and I'm sure if you made the right approaches you could examine the evidence first hand.

Or if you wanted a simpler, less shoe-leather approach, you could always read a book about George Muller and his orphanages.

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