Tuesday, February 2, 2010

Andrei Stuff quizz - Stuff up

The daily Stuff Triva Quizz is a bit of fun.
Sometimes the questions are a bit dodgy - but for the most part it doesn't matter.
But this question cannot pass without comment.
So what is the correct answer and is it contained within the choices? And how did the person who composed this question get it so terribly wrong?

Update: Stuff has fixed it.


17 comment(s):

Lucia Maria said...

The answer is Roman Catholic. I don't know about the 7th Day Adventists, but Anglicans have a different understanding of what the Creed means than what it actually means. I suppose to be PC, we could include them in the answer, but it's a stretch.

leftrightout said...

An oddity, as even *I* knew the answer they gave was wrong. My Protestant friends always declare that RC's are not "real christians", but then again, my pentecostal friends say the same about the Proddies.

Gotta laff.

Andrei said...

Actually I was taught that the Nicene Creed was the Symbol of Faith and adhering to it or at least the tenets contained within it was the fundamental definition of Christianity.

In any case Anglicans, Lutherans, Presbyterians etc all use it in their worship.

As to their understanding of it I wouldn't comment.

But the Nicene Creed belongs to the Church not just the Roman Catholic Church and the question just demonstrates ignorance and lack of "cultural understanding".

ZenTiger said...

Leftrightout, RC is not "wrong", it is perhaps "the most correct" answer, but it's pretty much a creed of importance for all Christian faiths.

I'm not sure how much the Adventists stray from the creed, given that they have developed some kind of new "list", but even they might agree the creed has relevance.

My Protestant friends always declare that RC's are not "real Christians"

It would be interesting to see what their definition of Christian was, and then explain why Roman Catholics are, in their eyes, not "Christian". It's a strange thing to argue. Perhaps that's why they make such good heretics? :-)

Lucia Maria said...

Andrei,

Something only slightly related to all of this, have you seen this article? (or one like it?)

"The Pope Is the First Among the Patriarchs." Just How Remains to Be Seen
With Benedict XVI, for the first time in history, the Orthodox have agreed to discuss the primacy of the bishop of Rome, according to the model of the first millennium, when the Church was undivided. Never before seen: the outline of the dialogue.

Lucia Maria said...

Oh, except it looks like the important part of the article has been removed as it shouldn't have been made public. Darn.

Andrei said...

There's a long way to go Lucia - one of the sticky points would be the Topic of this post, the Nicene Creed, and a Latin addition to it - a topic too big for a blog comment.

But relationships between the Patriarchs and the Vatican have never been better.

Andrei said...

Leftrightout your comment makes me laugh -
The Roman Catholic Church is to all intents and purposes the Western Church - were there no Christians in the West until the reformation?

That's just too silly

leftrightout said...

Andrei, it was a tongue in cheek comment. But if you ever have a theological discussion with a Presbyterian, you'll see what I mean. And as for the Pentecostals, well, what can I say...?

The "They're not real christians" is a line often trotted out in debates.

And,as I said earlier, Gotta laff.

Andrei said...

I'm glad it was tongue in check, anyone who judges who is or isn't a Christian based on denomination is a fool.

The Good Lord knows his own, it is not up to us to judge who is or isn't a Christian.

May I refer you to this post.

leftrightout said...

So andrei, do I take it from tjis that you are of the Orthodox persuasion? As in the eastern tradition, rather than my heterodox experiences? :-)

My only experience of the orthodox tradition is with a greek priest whose family ran a mini mart. Nice guy, cool beard, and I am a lover of Greek (Turkish) coffee, but I am not up with the doctrinal differences.

Psycho Milt said...

...how did the person who composed this question get it so terribly wrong?

Presumably they're just young. When I was a kid you became familiar with religious concepts whether you wanted to or not - these days kids can easily grow up knowing nothing of religions. The problem with the quiz was obvious to me and would have been obvious to me as a 12-year-old, but my kids wouldn't have had a clue what it was talking about.

...Anglicans have a different understanding of what the Creed means than what it actually means.

This is simply wrong. It's read out at every service as the basis of Christian belief, and the meaning of it is straightforward.

macdoctor said...

...how did the person who composed this question get it so terribly wrong?

Nah, PM, it is not that they are young, it is because they get their knowledge of Christianity from Dan Brown. Mr. Brown seems to think that the Nicene Creed was a Catholic invention.

Mr. Brown's knowledge of church history could be written on the back of a postage stamp with a six inch paintbush.

ZenTiger said...

...Anglicans have a different understanding of what the Creed means than what it actually means.

This is simply wrong. It's read out at every service as the basis of Christian belief, and the meaning of it is straightforward.


Simply wrong?

Then explain why there is supposedly no difference of interpretation in this part of the creed:

We believe in one, holy, catholic, and apostolic Church.

Indeed, some Christian denominations prefer to remove the word "Catholic" (universal) completely and use the word "Christian".

And just to make it interesting:

Matthew 16:18: "You are Peter, and on this rock I will build my Church."

MrTips said...

Mr. Brown seems to think that the Nicene Creed was a Catholic invention.

And from a historical point of view he is correct. - it was a Catholic invention, for only one Christian Church existed at the time, and the convoking of the Nicean Council by Constantine, probably in accord with Pope Sylvester I (but this is not totally clear) was a response to the Arian heresy. The result was the Nicean Creed (which invokes one holy, CATHOLIC and apostolic Church) and, the canons and the synodal decree. Catholicity here of course means universal, as a staement from all the bishops present at that time.

Remarkably, many historians agree Constantine kept out of the proceedings inasmuch as he could.

This is not to say that the Nicean Creed does not belong to all other Christian Churches now: it merely points out at the time that only one Christian Church existed c325AD.

http://www.newadvent.org/cathen/11044a.htm

Andrei said...

And from a historical point of view he is correct.

Not if he is conflating the Latin Church with the Church, which he is.

I don't know when exactly the Latins took the title Catholic to describe the Western Church but it is something goes to the heart of the Great Schism

Lucia Maria said...

Andrei,

Where does the word "Catholic" belong then? The RCC controls a universal church that spans most countries on the globe, and can historically link herself right back to the Apostles, with a line of authority that goes right back to Rome. No other church can make that claim. Even the Orthodox, who have kept Apostolic succession, have no central authority and are more national churches than universal. The Anglicans are the only ones who could take on the title ... but they lost Apostolic succession centuries ago.

Quite honestly I don't want to offend you on this, but it does to get the point where plain speaking is necessary.

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